Where/What Is a Credit Card Number

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You landed here because you can’t seem to get Where/What Is a Credit Card Number? It’s ok, below is a well-explanatory guide to understanding Where/What Is a Credit Card Number?

What is a credit card?

A credit card can be a simple and flexible way of borrowing money.

Every time you pay with a credit card, you borrow from your card provider to make that payment.

It’s up to you whether you pay off your statement balance in full each month or over time. If you pay it off later, you may be charged interest on what you owe, unless you are in an introductory interest-free period. You may also be charged credit card fees.

Where/What Is a Credit Card Number

The long 16-19 numbers on the front of your card are your credit card number. It is usually between 16 and 19 digits long and is unique to you.

Credit Card Back and Front (Photos)

Credit card long number
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  1. Credit card information
    The long 16-19 numbers on the front of your card is your credit card number. It is usually between 16 and 19 digits long and is unique to you.
Credit card expiry date number
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  1. Valid from/Expires end
    The month and year your credit card was issued, as well as the date it will expire, are indicated by these numbers.
Credit card CVV number
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  1. ‘CVV’ stands for ‘card verification value’ and is a security number.
    This is the last three digits of the number printed on the signature strip for Mastercard and Visa.

The ‘long number’ on the front of your credit card is normally 16 digits, but can be up to 19 digits in some cases. A Permanent Account Number, or PAN, is what it’s called formally.

Where Is Credit Card Number

But it isn’t just a number. Your credit card number is personal to you and contains information that allows you to identify your account, card, and the company that provided it.

The provider is denoted by the first digit:

  • Mastercard numbers start with a 2 or 5.
  • Visa card numbers start with a 4.
  • American Express numbers start with a 3.

Except for the last digit, which is known as a “check digit,” all of the numbers after that are specific to your account. When you make a purchase or make a payment, this allows us to verify that you have entered the complete credit card number, in the correct order.

Hans Peter Luhn, an IBM engineer, created this method for generating credit card numbers in 1954, and it is used worldwide.

Valid/Expires

The month and year your card was issued, as well as the date it will expire, are represented by these numerals. 06/20, for example, is June 2020.

Credit cards are usually issued for two to four years and then renewed just before they expire. The ‘expires end’ date is three years and one month after the ‘valid from’ date, allowing you a bit more time to move to your new card.

You won’t be able to use your old card once it has expired, so start using a new card as soon as it arrives to avoid any future problems.

If your credit card is reissued for whatever reason, such as a lost card, your new card will have amended “valid from” and “expires end” dates, as you might expect.

Any outdated cards should be broken up and disposed of carefully for security reasons.

CVV (Security Numbers)

When you make a purchase online or over the phone, you may be asked for the ‘CVV’, ‘CVC’, ‘CVN’, ‘CVV2’, or a ‘security number’. In reality, they’re all the same thing.

In simple terms, it’s a card verification number or code. Because it’s only ever printed on the card itself when you provide it, that helps us to verify the physical card is still in your possession.

On Visa and Mastercard credit cards, you’ll find your security number on the back of your card. It’s the last 3 digits of the number printed in the top right-hand corner of the signature strip.

On American Express credit cards it’s a 4-digit number printed on the front, just above and to the right of the long credit card number.

Key points about credit card numbers

where what is credit card number
  • The long credit card number is usually 16-19 digits and is unique to you.
  • The ‘valid from’ date is the month and year your card was opened. 
  • ‘Expired from’ details the month and year your card will expire. 
  • For Mastercard and Visa, the ‘CVV’ or ‘security number’ is the last 3 digits of the number printed in the top right-hand corner of the signature strip. 
  • To use your card at an ATM or shop, you’ll need your PIN, even for some contactless transactions. Although all of your card numbers should be kept safe, only you should ever know you PIN.

How can I use a credit card?

Card purchases

Paying for things in-store or online using your credit card – you won’t pay interest if you pay off your statement balance every month. Some fees may still apply.

Why are card purchases useful?

  • To spread the cost of large purchases such as a holiday or TV.
  • It could help you manage your monthly budget for everyday spending like groceries.

Balance transfers

Moving your borrowing from one card to a different credit card from a different provider. Transfer fees may apply.

Why are balance transfers useful?

  • To organise your existing debts.
  • To reduce interest payments by moving to a lower rate card, and to pay off your debt more quickly.

Money transfers

Transferring money directly from your credit card into your UK current account. Fees may apply. Money transfers may not always be offered immediately with a new credit card by some providers.

Why are money transfers useful?

  • For unexpected costs to your current account, such as car repairs.
  • To avoid use of your unplanned overdraft.

Cash transactions

Using your credit card to withdraw cash or buy foreign currency. This may incur fees and you will pay interest from the date of purchase. 

You can use credit and debit cards in similar ways, but there are differences that are important to note, since, they could influence what you choose to use them for. These include:

  • Card features and benefits.
  • The costs for using your card at home and abroad.
  • Your responsibilities if you choose to use credit.

  •  can credit card withdraw money

Yes! The majority of credit cards allow you to withdraw cash from an ATM. Isn’t this wonderful news?

Difference between Credit and Debit Card

What is a debit card?

  • It’s linked to your bank account. When you use it, money is taken from your account.
  • You’re basically spending money that’s yours, unless you have an overdraft, which is a type of credit linked to your account. Interest and charges may apply to overdrafts.
  • You can use a debit card to withdraw cash from ATMs, or pay for goods and services.

Debit card features

  • Withdraw cash at an ATM – up to £500 per day with a Lloyds Bank debit card, or more in-branch.
  • Request cashback at most UK supermarket check-outs – up to £50 with a Lloyds Bank debit card.
  • Set up one-off and regular payments from your bank account.
  • Debit cards are usually contactless, so you can make small transactions without entering your PIN.

What is a credit card?

  • It’s a standalone account, giving you access to credit that you’ll need to pay back later. Essentially, it’s a form of borrowing.
  • You’re not spending your own money. Instead you’re using a pre-agreed credit limit, which could help you to spread larger expenses and manage everyday essentials.
  • You can use a credit card to withdraw cash from ATMs, or pay for goods and services. Just bear in mind interest and charges may apply.

Credit card features

  • Request a balance transfer from most credit and some store cards. Fees may apply. Do this as part of your application with Lloyd Bank, or afterwards if you prefer.
  • Request a money transfer from your credit card to your UK current account. Fees may apply. At Lloyds Bank, this is only available on selected products and when your account is set up.
  • Set up regular payments through your credit card account.
  • Most credit card purchases of over £100 and up to £30,000 are covered by Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act.
  • Credit cards are usually contactless, so you can make small transactions without entering your PIN.

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